How To Store Your Seed For Next Season

If you found yourself with extra seed at the end of the season, don't worry! It's easy to store seed for the next planting season.

At the end of the Wildflower planting season, many gardeners ask us what to do with their leftover seed. Storing seed for next season is extremely easy and effective; simply place the seed in a ziploc bag or tupperware, making sure to label it clearly, and store in a room-temperature area. A dark closet or room is the perfect storage area, just make sure that the seed is not exposed to moisture or extreme temperatures. Seed will keep like this for months and maintain a high germination rate.

Did you know?

All of the seed at American Meadows is lab tested to ensure the highest purity and germination rates possible. When storing your seed for the winter (or even for the year), you may lose a few percentage points of the germination rate, but you’ll still have high quality seed that will thrive in your garden.


A lab test for our Cosmos Sensation Mix - 96% Germination Rate & 99.64% Pure Seed

Is this Seed Still Good? Do Your Own Germination Test to Find Out.

If you’ve been storing Wildflower Seed for a long time and aren’t sure if it’s still good, conduct your own germination test to find out.

It’s really easy:

  • Choose ten seeds at random.
  • Dampen a paper towel.
  • Place the seeds on top of the damp paper towel.
  • Place the paper towel/seeds in a dark, warm place.
  • Wait 10-14 days.
  • Check every few days until you see sprouts.

The number of seeds that have sprouted tells you the germination rate. For example, if 6/10 seeds sprout, you have a 60% germination rate.

If you found yourself with extra seed at the end of the season, don't worry! It's easy to store seed for the next planting season.

What’s a good germination rate?

The standard here at American Meadows is 75% germination rate, with most of our seed coming in higher than that.  Anything above 60-70% will produce great results in your garden or meadow.

How do you store your leftover seed for next season? Please share in the comments below or on our Facebook Page. Happy Gardening!

5 thoughts on “How To Store Your Seed For Next Season”

  • maureen

    so I am in Ohio now by Lake Erie should I plant my seeds now. I have bags of top soil. I also clipped the tops of my fall bushes last year, should I put them in a whole and cover them with dirt to see if they grow next year? This sounds so stupid sorry.

    Reply
  • SYLVIA SYLVESTER
    SYLVIA SYLVESTER August 5, 2016 at 10:03 am

    I bought $200. Of your seeds this year. I only got a few poppies, and allot of baby's breath. I didn't have any daisy's only a few tidy tips. . . I scattered seeds three different times, have a set watering system every morning and NOTHING CAME UP. . . .

    Reply
    • Jenny

      Hi Sylvia - what a sad story. We would never want you to pay for something that you did not get to enjoy! Please call our Customer Service department at (877) 309-7333 so that they can look up the specifics of your order and help you find the best solution. Happy Gardening - Jenny

      Reply
  • Sylvia sylvester
    Sylvia sylvester August 24, 2016 at 12:51 pm

    I tried to call, and got put on hold for a long time. Gave up. Wanted to say I have many perennial plants in my yard, Lupen, Fox Glove, Pione, Daisy, from plants over the last couple of years. I scattered the seeds in and around these beds, as well as in a natural field. I got exactly one poppy in the field, and it came in on the third sprinkle. We had a late frost this spring, so I thought that was what did in the first crop, although I never saw any seedlings coming up..... The next crop did nothing, and now out of nowhere I am getting a few varigated Poppies, several different colors. I ordered Red, but these colors are pretty too. The baby breath was prolific, and looked so pretty among my plants. I hope they re seed themselves. I have a few baby Lupin coming up, but they are native to this area, so don't know if they came up from your seeds or simply from nature and my constant care. . . I had hoped to have a large crop for next summer not the slow growth of the natural Lupin. The tidy tips came up but not allot of them. No purple cone flowers? I have a few of these seeds left, no coneflowers.
    I know that Lupen do not flower the first season but I did expect something from the daisy, and coneflower's. ?? I had never seen Tidy Tips but they were cute. I planted all the Tidy Tip seeds in order to get some this year. . . Anyway, I was disappointed. Now I am letting my flower beds go to seed for the year, in hopes of a better yield next year.

    Reply
    • Jenny

      Hi Sylvia - I'm sorry to hear that you were placed on hold. We are proud to say that our longest wait time this month has been 12 minutes, with most incoming calls being answered immediately. We're glad to hear that you were able to save and scatter seed from your perennials! Remember that those new seedlings will still need to establish themselves during their first season of growth and that you can expect blooms in the second year. Your plan of allowing your beds to go to seed at the end of the season is a smart way to get your flowers to re-produce - I hope this works well for you. With regards to your natural field planting, you would definitely need to put some effort into preparing the soil beforehand to get good results; removing grass and weeds before scattering your flower seed is non-negotiable if you'd like your flowers to take over. You can find great instructions for planting from seed here: http://www.americanmeadows.com/wildflower-how-to
      Hope this helps and Happy Gardening - Jenny

      Reply
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