Looking Back: How Pinterest Helped Me Get Through Winter

succulents-containers

Like many gardeners, I tend to get a little, well, depressed in the winter months. There is something therapeutic, soul enhancing and fun about planning, planting, weeding and generally being outside in the warmer months. Unfortunately, I live somewhere with a very long, cold winter, and can’t garden for at least 6 months out of the year.

This year, I got through it by maintaining an indoor herb garden, growing a variety of Amaryllis Bulbs, and plotting and scheming my spring garden on Pinterest.

That’s right – Pinterest. Now, it may seem like just another social media platform, but it really is a useful tool to help organize not only your immediate garden plans, but also that dream garden that you may not be able to plant this season (or next).

Credit: ultraBobban/Flickr Credit: ultraBobban/Flickr

This year, at least for me, it’s all about container gardening. My garden beds are bursting with Roses, Peonies, Hostas, Ornamental Grasses, Daylilies, Hydrangea and much, much more – They really can’t take any more plants (although I will, probably, tuck a few Gladiolus bulbs here and there). And, as an obsessive gardener, I can’t just not garden, so that means I have to get creative!

That’s where Pinterest comes in. I am looking for new and creative ways to add color, fragrance, and edible plants to my tiny, city garden without stuffing the garden beds any more.

Scouring through hundreds of thousands of other gardeners’ ideas on Pinterest was one of the most fun activities in the winter months. After doing this many days a week, I found a DIY project that I’ll create this spring – A tall, raised bed about 3' off the ground that will be about 8’ long by 3’ wide and 2.5’ deep. It will have a trellis attached to the back where I will plant my tomatoes, pole beans, cucumbers and squash. It will also serve another purpose – To provide privacy and act as a separator between my yard and my neighbors’. On each side, I am going to put standing trellises that almost look like Japanese privacy screens, but are foldable and movable for easy storage. In front of these I will plant easy-to-grow Morning Glory seeds for more privacy.

Grape hyacinths in tin containersI’m also a sucker for annuals. Even though perennials are the lifeblood of my garden, annuals add that extra ‘wow’ factor. This year, I’ll plant a mixture of bulbs (Gladiolus, Dahlias, Caladium) with annuals I’ll get at the garden center. For extra room, I am going to make my own rope hangers and hang a variety of the containers from my 6’ picket fence. I’ll probably add herbs in there too – whatever won’t fit in the big raised vegetable bed.

This year, I also had the great idea (from Pinterest) to create tiered containers that will house succulents and flowering plants for a unique, textured look. I’ve also purchased solar-powered string lights, because who wouldn’t want to look at their hard work in the night, too?

Now that the ground has (sort of) thawed and I've stubbornly planted Pansies, I’ll still be browsing Pinterest for fun, interesting ways to arrange my cut flowers and add more vertical space to my tiny garden.

I find it helpful to create different boards, like 'For the Shade,' 'Container Gardening,' or 'Big Ideas' to help categorize the pins you save on your Pinterest Board. How do you use Pinterest for your garden?

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4 thoughts on “Looking Back: How Pinterest Helped Me Get Through Winter”

  • susan mertens

    I would like to knwo more about how to use perennials for planting and gardening tips. What are the best perennials for shaded areas? What are the best vegetables to plant on the side of the house, and when can i start planting? I live in the midwest area so probably not until memorial day, but thought i could start sooner for planting the perinnals.

    Reply
    • Amanda

      Hi Susan,

      I sent over recommendations on your last comments, but as for when to plant, we recommend waiting until the chance of frost has passed in your area. For us (here in Vermont) that usually means around the beginning of May.

      Happy Gardening,

      Amanda

      Reply
  • susan mertens

    I would also like to know what type of plants i can plant around a patio? Want to plant something pretty, but small around small bushes? Any recommendations.

    Reply
  • susan mertens

    Hi

    Yes, I agree. I love planting flowers, and see them grow. Just wondering what type of perinnals to plant in shaded areas around small bushes. Or annual plants that would best for all summer.

    Reply
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