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Re-Blooming Bearded Iris Sugar Blues

Re-Blooming Bearded Iris Sugar Blues is one of the most stunning royal blue irises ever. Blooms spring & fall. (Iris germanica)

Item Size

Bareroot Plant

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Details:

Zones: 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9
Plant Size: 36" tall, Plant rhizomes 12-24" apart
Light: Full Sun
Bloom Time: Late spring to early summer and again in early in mid fall
Shipping: Bearded Iris start shipping in early August.

Click Here for more details, product description, reviews, how-to guides and shipping information.

 
 

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Details
SKU 35IRIS
Common Name Re-Blooming Bearded Iris or German Iris
Botanical Name Iris germanica
Zones 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9
Light Requirements Full Sun
Flower Color Blue
Estimated Mature Height 36" tall
Estimated Mature Spread Plant rhizomes 12-24" apart
Bloom Time Late spring to early summer and again in early in mid fall
Planting Depth Iris should be planted so the tops of the rhizomes are exposed and the roots are spread out facing downwards in the soil. Make sure not to plant the rhizomes too deep.
Ships As Bulb, Rhizome, Tuber
Planting Season Summer, Fall
Will Tolerate Sandy Soil, Loamy Soil, Clay Soil
Soil Moisture Average, Well Draining
Suggested Uses Deer Resistant, Fragrant, Multiple Blooms / Harvest, Easy to Grow
Ships to Canada No
Our Master Gardeners Suggest Pairing With:
  • Garden Gloves

    Garden Gloves

Description
Of all the blue and purplish irises, this one is a big favorite. The upper petals and the falls are true, rich Royal Blue--a knockout.

Growing Bearded Irises These majestic flowers are surprisingly easy to grow, and actually require less attention than almost any other garden flowers. Your iris roots will arrive with the foliage "trimmed" from this spring's growth. You'll find the "root" is not really a bulb, but what is called a "rhizome"--an irregularly shaped bulbous root that grows at a right angle from the foliage. Leave the trimmed foliage as it is, and simply bury the rhizome with the top of it showing through the soil surface. Bearded irises grow best with the tops of their rhizomes exposed.

Next spring, new foliage and the flower spikes will sprout strongly from the rhizome. What's more, next summer, you'll notice the rhizome multiplying for even more flowers as years go by.

Our Master Gardeners Suggest Pairing With:
  • Garden Gloves

    Garden Gloves

Reviews

REVIEW SNAPSHOT®

by PowerReviews
American MeadowsRe-blooming Bearded Iris Sugar Blues
 
3.0

(based on 10 reviews)

Ratings Distribution

  • 5 Stars

     

    (1)

  • 4 Stars

     

    (3)

  • 3 Stars

     

    (2)

  • 2 Stars

     

    (3)

  • 1 Stars

     

    (1)

60%

of respondents would recommend this to a friend.

Pros

  • Low maintenance (5)
  • Large bulb size (4)
  • Reliable growth (3)
  • Vivid colors (3)

Cons

    Best Uses

    • Cut flowers (5)
    • Large areas (4)
    • Raised beds (4)
    • Border control (3)
      • Reviewer Profile:
      • Avid gardener (5), Master gardener (3)

    Most Liked Positive Review

     

    I fell in love with the color

    I could not believe the vivid color of this Iris! It was very eye catching and my neighbors stopped by to ask about it. I also enjoyed it reblooming in the fall.

    I could not believe the vivid color of this Iris! It was very eye catching and my neighbors stopped by to ask about it. I also enjoyed it reblooming in the fall.

    VS

    Most Liked Negative Review

     

    So far a no show

    Not sure if it was the mild winter, but none of the Iris bulbs I purchased are coming up. I am disappointed at this time. I have seen other Irises blooming, but I...Read complete review

    Not sure if it was the mild winter, but none of the Iris bulbs I purchased are coming up. I am disappointed at this time. I have seen other Irises blooming, but I don't even have the stems coming up.

    Reviewed by 10 customers

    Sort by

    Displaying reviews 1-10

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    4.0

    First season growth

    By Shirley the gardener

    from Delaware OH

    About Me Avid Gardener, Master Gardener

    Verified Reviewer

    Pros

      Cons

        Best Uses

          Comments about American Meadows Re-blooming Bearded Iris Sugar Blues:

          Once again, I haven't seen this iris bloom, but hopefully next year it will.

           
          1.0

          Didn't get a flower---lots of leaves

          By Moe

          from Amherst , NY

          About Me Casual Hobbyist

          Pros

          • Looks Healthy
          • Lots Of Leaves

          Cons

          • No Flowers

          Best Uses

          • Raised Beds

          Comments about American Meadows Re-blooming Bearded Iris Sugar Blues:

          no flowers

           
          5.0

          Beautiful Iris

          By Sarah the Flower Lady

          from Wamego, Ks.

          About Me Avid Gardener

          Verified Reviewer

          Pros

          • Large Bulb Size
          • Low Maintenance
          • Reliable Growth
          • Very Good Quality Roots
          • Vivid Colors

          Cons

          • None

          Best Uses

          • Cut Flowers
          • Erosion Control
          • Good Color Wedgefieldglo
          • Large Areas
          • Raised Beds

          Comments about American Meadows Re-blooming Bearded Iris Sugar Blues:

          I just ordered Iris bulbs and planted them a few weeks ago. Very good quality and are now growing nice leaves. Can't wait until next Spring to see the blooms!

           
          2.0

          Not such a good bulb

          By Sarah, the flower girl

          from Wamego, Ks.

          About Me Avid Gardener

          Pros

          • Hopefully Will Be Better

          Cons

          • Small Bulb

          Best Uses

            Comments about American Meadows Re-blooming Bearded Iris Sugar Blues:

            Maybe I will be surprised next Summer, but the bulb is not a quality bulb, just one "fan" and pretty small.

             
            2.0

            Where's the BLUE? Not at all true blue.

            By Lost in PineCone Country USA

            from Extreme NW Montana

            About Me Avid Gardener

            Verified Reviewer

            Pros

            • Deer resistant
            • Low Maintenance

            Cons

            • Colors Not As Expected
            • Short Bloom Time

            Best Uses

            • Border Control
            • Flower Garden

            Comments about American Meadows Re-blooming Bearded Iris Sugar Blues:

            My Sugar Blues is not Blue at all. It's a light to medium lavender at best. NO BLUE at all to it. Very disapointed. Planted a variety of 4 iris from AM last fall. Two made it up & look healthy including the Sugar Blues. Sadly the Pink & Plum colors didn't over winter...all were planted together. Perhaps the rebloom period will bring flower stalks on the yellow. I kept the labels with the bulbs as planted too. It can be difficult to fall plant iris's up here though. Husband said it best...just ho hum not at all deep blue as expected and flowers are short lived compared to other iris in bloom too.

             
            3.0

            Nothing has happened yet.

            By Gary

            from Chula Vista, Ca.

            About Me Master Gardener

            Verified Reviewer

            Pros

            • Large Bulb Size
            • Low Maintenance
            • Pest Resistant

            Cons

            • Slow Growth

            Best Uses

            • Containers
            • Cut Flowers
            • Large Areas

            Comments about American Meadows Re-blooming Bearded Iris Sugar Blues:

            Still waiting for it to bloom.

             
            4.0

            Beautiful blues

            By Airin

            from Fairfax, Va

            About Me Casual Hobbyist

            Verified Reviewer

            Pros

            • Fragrant
            • Large Bulb Size
            • Vivid Colors

            Cons

              Best Uses

              • Cut Flowers

              Comments about American Meadows Re-blooming Bearded Iris Sugar Blues:

              If the tuber is too close to the surface squirrels might get to them or they may dry out. But when they bloom they are beautiful and a great gift for any iris lover.

               
              3.0

              Waiting for next year!

              By Finally retire to do & grow what I want!

              from Almaden Valley, San Jose, CA

              About Me Master Gardener

              Pros

              • Low Maintenance
              • Pest Resistant
              • Reliable Growth

              Cons

                Best Uses

                • Border Control
                • Containers
                • Cut Flowers
                • Large Areas
                • Raised Beds

                Comments about American Meadows Re-blooming Bearded Iris Sugar Blues:

                Unfortunately some of the Iris I purchased didn't bloom the first year. I was very happy with the one that did bloom, called Blue Suede Shoes. I would highly recommend this beautifull Iris and welcomed addition to my garden. (SKU0 33SIRIS)

                (5 of 6 customers found this review helpful)

                 
                2.0

                So far a no show

                By Linda

                from Milford, OH

                About Me Getting Started

                Pros

                  Cons

                  • Nothing coming up yet

                  Best Uses

                  • Around mailboxes
                  • Border Control

                  Comments about American Meadows Re-blooming Bearded Iris Sugar Blues:

                  Not sure if it was the mild winter, but none of the Iris bulbs I purchased are coming up. I am disappointed at this time. I have seen other Irises blooming, but I don't even have the stems coming up.

                  (6 of 6 customers found this review helpful)

                   
                  4.0

                  I fell in love with the color

                  By Diane

                  from Heathsville, VA

                  About Me Avid Gardener

                  Pros

                  • Great shipment
                  • Large Bulb Size
                  • Long Bloom Time
                  • Low Maintenance
                  • Reliable Growth
                  • Vivid Colors

                  Cons

                    Best Uses

                    • Cut Flowers
                    • Grouping
                    • Large Areas
                    • Raised Beds

                    Comments about American Meadows Re-blooming Bearded Iris Sugar Blues:

                    I could not believe the vivid color of this Iris! It was very eye catching and my neighbors stopped by to ask about it. I also enjoyed it reblooming in the fall.

                    Displaying reviews 1-10

                    Back to top

                    1
                    How-To Guides

                    Bearded Iris Planting & Care

                    Bearded iris, Iris germanica, is a hardy, long-lived perennial that require a minimum of maintenance. The flowers have six petals; three upright petals (called standards) and three hanging petals (called falls). A fuzzy line or beard runs down the middle of each fall. Flowers come in many colors including blue, pink, purple, reddish, white, yellow, and bi-colors. Most bearded iris flower in the spring (April to June depending on cultivar), but some of the new cultivars re-flower in the summer and fall. The second flower display is not as showy as the spring display but last into the fall. Many re-blooming iris are fragrant.

                    Bearded irises are classified into several types: miniature dwarf (height 8 inch or less, 1 to 2 inch diameter flowers), standard dwarf (height 8 to 15 inches), intermediate (height 16 to 27 inches), miniature tall (height 16 to 25 inches, small flowers), border (height 16 to 27 inches), and tall (height 28 to 38 inches). The shorter iris flower first, followed by the intermediate, and then the taller irises.

                    Growth Habit

                    Iris have thick, fleshy, underground stems (called rhizomes) that store food produced by the sword-shaped, semi-evergreen leaves. The rhizomes grow best when planted at or slightly below the soil surface with feeder roots penetrating the soil below. Each year underground offsets develop from the original rhizome. Buds produce a large fan of leaves and several flower stalks. Success with iris depends on keeping the rhizomes firm and healthy. In general, this is done by providing the rhizome good drainage while the feeder roots below remain moist but not wet.

                    Site Selection and Preparation

                    A full sun exposure is preferred; however, some of the delicate pink and blue iris hold their color better in partial shade. Excessive shade will reduce or prevent flowering. Good soil drainage is essential to prevent rhizomes from rotting. It may be necessary to plant the rhizomes in raised beds (at least 6 inches high) to obtain proper drainage.

                    Iris will grow in many soil types but a light, loamy soil with a pH of 6 to 7 that has been amended with organic matter is preferred. A tight clay soil may keep the rhizome too wet and should have organic matter (pine bark, compost) incorporated to improve drainage. Manure is not usually recommended for iris but can be used if well-rotted and incorporated at least 6 inches deep into the bed (should not come in contact with rhizomes).

                    Fertilization of iris is important to obtain best results, but must be done in moderation. Nitrogen, potash, and phosphorus are essential for iris, but excessive nitrogen promotes lush growth that is more susceptible to rot diseases. At planting, incorporate ½ lb of a low-nitrogen fertilizer such as 5-10-10 per 50 ft2 (1 ½ oz per 10 ft2). Taking and following the results of a soil test is the preferred method to determine fertilizer amounts.

                    Planting

                    The best time to plant bearded iris is July through September. This will allow them to become well established before winter. Container-grown iris can be planted in the spring. In a well-prepared bed, dig a shallow hole large enough to accommodate the rhizome or clump of rhizomes. Form a mound of soil in the center for the planting base. Make the mound high enough so the top of the rhizome is slightly above soil level. Spread the roots around the mound, fill with soil, and water. For a mass of color, plant at least three rhizomes (spaced 8 to 10 inches apart) or plant undivided clumps; point each fan of leaves away from the center of the group. Clumps should be spaced 18 inches apart. Mulch should be applied to fall-planted iris to reduce heaving during the winter.

                    Care and Maintenance

                    Before flowering, water plants often enough to keep the soil moist but not wet. Reblooming iris should be watered during the summer, while spring-flowering iris will tolerate drought. After flowers fade, cut flower stalks back to an inch or two above the rhizome to prevent seed formation. Plants that are growing well (good green foliage) may not need fertilizing. If you fertilize, apply ½ cup of 5-10-10 fertilizer per iris clump after flowering. Fertilizer can burn the rhizomes; it should be applied around but not directly on them. Reblooming iris should be fertilized in the spring as new growth begins and after spring flowering ends. Iris respond to shallow (1 to 2 inches) cultivation and should not be mulched. In early fall, cut leaves 6 to 8 inches from the ground, especially if foliage disease occur.

                    After 3 to 5 years, iris generally become crowded and should be divided. Iris can be divided any time, but many growers prefer to divide 4 to 6weeks after the flowering period. Cut the leaves to one-third their length. Dig the clump and wash soil off with a hose. Cut rhizomes apart so that each section has at least one healthy fan of leaves and firm, white roots. Older rhizomes may seem firm but should be discarded since they have limited flowering capacity.

                    Common Bearded Iris Problems

                    Poor flowering -- is normally due to planting in excessive shade, using excessive nitrogen fertilizer, or planting the rhizomes too deep. Limited flowering may also occur if plants become too crowded and need dividing.

                    Bacterial soft rot -- is the most serious iris disease. Bacteria enter through injuries or cuts to the rhizome. Soft rot causes the rhizomes to become mushy and have a disagreeable odor. Use of fresh manure or excess nitrogen, coupled with poor drainage, contribute to soft rot development. Dig up and destroy diseased rhizomes. If the rot is not extensive, cut off and destroy diseased plant parts.

                    Crown rot fungus -- causes a rot at the base of leaves where they join the rhizome and causes them to fall over. It is identified by reddish-brown "mustard seeds" which are produced by the fungus. Trim leaves to admit more sunlight and air movement to the rhizomes; carefully remove and destroy all diseased leaves.

                    Leaf spots -- After flowering, leaves may become dotted with small, brown spots. Bacterial leaf spot has a watery, streaked appearance. Water-soaked margins around the spot turn yellow. Fungal leaf spots are rust-colored, drier, and more confined. Since disease organisms overwinter on old foliage, cut and destroy leaves of infected plants in the fall. Spray with a registered fungicide during extended periods of high humidity or rainy seasons.

                    Mosaic -- is a viral disease that causes a mottling of leaves and flowers. It is transmitted by aphids. Remove and destroy infected plants and control aphids.

                    Iris borer -- The first symptoms of iris borers are small notches on the leaf edge or small accumulation of sawdust frass in early spring. Iris later develop loose, rotted bases and holes in rhizomes. Bacterial soft rot readily attacks borer-infested plants. Carefully remove and destroy old leaves, stems, and plant debris in the fall. A registered insecticide can be applied to the rhizomes in the spring as new growth occurs.

                    Our Master Gardeners Suggest Pairing With:
                    • Garden Gloves

                      Garden Gloves

                    Shipping

                    Bearded Iris start shipping in early August.

                    View Shipping Rate Chart

                    As soon as your order is placed you will receive a confirmation email. You will receive a second email the day your order ships telling you how it has been sent. Fall bulbs are shipped at the proper planting time for your hardiness zone. Perennial orders may arrive separately from bulbs and seeds. If your order requires more than one shipment, there is no additional shipping charge. See our Shipping Information page for approximate ship dates and more detailed information. If you need express shipping or have any questions, please call Customer Service toll-free at (877) 270-5187 or Contact Us by email.

                    Our Master Gardeners Suggest Pairing With:
                    • Garden Gloves

                      Garden Gloves

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