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Hibiscus Showtime

Hibiscus syriacus Showtime View Larger Image



Regular Price: $33.98

Sale $16.99

per Plant - 4" pot You save: 50%
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Hibiscus Syriacus Showtime has semi-double, light purple- pink flowers with red centers. Colorful, variegated foliage forms with shades of light green, yellow, and darker green. The enormous blooms will not only provide a spectacular show, but will attract butterflies and hummingbirds to the garden. (Hibiscus syriacus)

Zones 5 - 9
Attract Birds
Attract Birds
Hedge / Screen
Hedge / Screen
Light Requirements
Full Sun
Full Sun
Mature Plant Size 48-108" tall (4-9' tall), 48-60" wide (4-5' wide)
Bloom Time Summer to fall
Size Plant - 4" pot

Plant Information

Rose of Sharon, also known as Hibiscus syriacus is a great shrub for late summer bloom. Many gardeners wonder what is the difference between Hardy Hibiscus and Hibiscus syriacus. It’s pretty simple, Hardy Hibiscus and Hibiscus syriacus are hardy landscape shrubs. Both members of the hibiscus family. Able to tolerate zones 5-9. They produce larger shrubs and lovely large blues in mid to late summer. They are easy to grow and can be pruned to control size in early spring. Best if planted in sun and well-draining soil.

Other types of Hibiscus are more tender and don’t tolerate colder temperatures. These are the tropical types such as Hibiscus rosa-sinensis or Chinese hibiscus. These are usually considered annuals and or live inside when frost threatens and cold temperatures.

Common Name Rose of Sharon
Botanical Name Hibiscus syriacus
Zones 5, 6, 7, 8, 9
Light Requirements Full Sun
Flower Color Pink
Flower Size 6-8"
Mature Height 48-108" tall (4-9' tall)
Estimated Mature Spread 48-60" wide (4-5' wide)
Bloom Time Summer to fall
Planting Depth Crown of plant should rest just at or above the soil surface after watering in.
Ships As Potted Plant
Planting Time Fall
Soil Type Clay Soil, Sandy Soil, Loamy Soil
Soil Moisture Average, Moist/Wet, Well Draining
Advantages Attract Birds, Hedge / Screen
Ships to Hawaii, Alaska & Canada No

Planting & Care

How to Grow and Care For Hardy Hibiscus

Planting - How Hibiscus Arrives

When you receive your Hardy Hibiscus plant from American Meadows, it could look like a pot of soil with sticks. Seems disappointing, but looks are deceiving because actually there is a thriving strong root system below the soil. The hibiscus is dormant and hasn’t emerged yet. We want you to successfully grow and care for your Hardy Hibiscus. To start planting, there are a few growing conditions to consider before planting.

Planting Needs

Hardy Hibiscus thrives best in well drained soil, amended with organic matter. Hibiscus prefers acidic soil. To add acidity to your soil, add Peat moss or potting soil to your garden. If your soil is mostly clay, consider planting Hibiscus in a raised bed, this helps to eliminate water buildup.

The best time to plant Hardy Hibiscus is after all danger of frost has passed. To plant, dig a hole double the size of the pot and set the plant in, the crown of the plant should rest just at or above the soil surface. Press the new loose dirt around the plant and water. If you water and the base of the plant shows, add more soil. If you are planting multiple Hibiscus, space plants 2 to 3 ft apart in the garden. Although the plant maybe small, these beauties reach 48” – 72” Tall.

Location and Light

Hardy Hibiscus is slow to emerge in cold springs or early summers, so be patient. Hardy Hibiscus does best in full sun. They will grow in partial shade, but growth and flowering will suffer. If you live in areas with very hot summers, during the hottest part of the day, Hibiscus may need shade. Hibiscus should be planted along, or in the back of perennial flower beds.

After Planting Care for Years of Growth


Hibiscus needs lots of nutrients. There are a few ways to fertilize Hibiscus. One option is in the spring; apply a layer of compost around the base of the plant. Or apply fertilizer with 10-4-12, 9-3-13 or 10-10-10 around the base of the hibiscus. Be careful not to add too much fertilizer, too much phosphorous will kill hibiscus.


Hibiscus is hardy to zone 5. Hardy hibiscus benefits from warm temperatures for bud growth, so if it’s a cold spring or summer, growth will be slower. To keep Hibiscus warm apply a layer of mulch to protect Hibiscus in the winter and early spring.


Hibiscus needs both moist and well drained soil. If Hibiscus dries out to much it will drop all its foliage and will look like a bunch of dead sticks. When this happens don’t stress, it will re-bud, it’s the Hibiscus protecting its roots system. It’s important to not over water or underwater. If you are growing hibiscus in a container, plant your hibiscus in a pot with adequate drainage holes. Otherwise if Hibiscus is in water to long, its root will begin to rot.


Hibiscus don’t need to be pruned. But if you choose to shape Hibiscus the best time to do so, is in late fall or winter depending on your location. Otherwise Hibiscus produces new growth every year from the ground up. To encourage branching and more flowers stalk, prune is in early summer when Hibiscus has starts to grow.

Further Reading:


Now shipping within 5 business days.

As soon as your order is placed you will receive a confirmation email. You will receive a second email the day your order ships telling you how it has been sent. Fall bulbs are shipped at the proper planting time for your hardiness zone. Perennial orders may arrive separately from bulbs and seeds. If your order requires more than one shipment, there is no additional shipping charge. See our shipping information page for approximate ship dates and more detailed information. If you need express shipping or have any questions, please call Customer Service toll-free at (877) 309-7333 or contact us by email.

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USDA Hardiness Planting Zones

To determine if a plant is sufficiently cold hardy, the USDA created numbered zones indicating winter low temperatures; the lower the zone number the colder the winter.

  • If the coldest winter temperature expected in your area is -15°F (zone 5) then any plants rated zones 3-5 will survive the winter temperatures in your area.
  • If you live in very warm winter areas (zones 9-11) plants with zones 3-4 ratings are not recommended. The lack of freezing winter temperatures do not provide a time for winter dormancy (rest).

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