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Wild Lily Bulbs Martagon

White Wild Lily Bulbs Martagon, Lilium Martagon, Wild Lily



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Shipping begins in late March based on ground temperatures, warmest zones first. Learn More…

This hard-to-find species from Europe is one of the hardiest, toughest, and easiest to grow species lilies, with up to 50 pink blooms per stem. (Lilium)

Zones 3 - 9
Attract Butterflies
Attract Butterflies
Easy to Grow
Easy to Grow
Cut Flowers
Cut Flowers
Light Requirements
Full Sun
Full Sun
Half Sun / Half Shade
Half Sun / Half Shade
Mature Plant Size 36-40" tall
Bulb Spacing8-12" apart
Bloom Time Mid to late summer

Plant Information

This multi-flowered wild lily has been common in gardens in Europe since the Renaissance. Called mountain lily' since its native range is mostly alpine, it is one of the hardiest, toughest, and easiest to grow species lilies.

The name 'Turk's Cap' is used to describe any lily with sharply recurved petals that create a sort of 'hanging lantern' shape. It's always been thought to resemble a turban, or 'Turk's cap.' (The common name is applied to a totally different, orange No. American lily too, since it has a similar flower form.)

But 'Lilium martagon' from Europe is the one that has been the ancestor for a whole host of multi-colored hybrids. But forget them. The original can be a true spectacle in your garden.

Compared to other species, this lily has smaller pinkish flowers, but it makes up for the flower size by putting up strong stems with up to (are you ready?) 50 flowers per stalk! Once established, your Martagon Lily can form a huge clump and result in what may be the biggest spectacle in your garden every season.

The Martagon Lily is a must for any wild plant collector's garden.

Like many wildflowers, this species has been over-picked and over-collected in the wild in its native range. You can be assured that our bulbs are nursery-cultivated in Holland.

ABC LILY PHOTOIn the 'A-B-C Combination Photo': The large photo of a red lily is Star Gazer, the most famous Oriental Hybrid.

Photos A and B are of 'wild' or species lilies. Photo A is the old favorite, orange Tiger Lily, one of the best for wild meadows since it is tough, dependably perennial and will grow in almost any soil. Photo B is the incredibly beautiful Regal Lily, Lilium regale, discovered years ago growing wild in China. It has been used to create a whole new group of hybrids.

Photo C shows how beautifully almost any lily works in a mixed garden or with other flowers in a vase. The stunning yellow bi-colored lily shown with red daylilies and gladiolus is the popular Asiatic Hybrid, 'Grand Cru'.

Growing Lilies: True lilies (which don't include daylilies and others which are not in the genus Lilium) are easy to grow today, and more popular every season. Since they are upright and take practically no space at ground level, it's easy to plant lilies between other established perennials and shrubs. Most can also tolerate some shade, which adds versatility for the gardener. There are many lily groups, but to keep it simple, we will consider only a few of the main types that are important to gardeners. Each lily we ship includes complete instructions for planting. So don't hesitate. You can easily bring the spectacular beauty of lily flowers to any summer meadow or garden.

'Wild' Lilies or 'Species' Lilies These are the true wildflowers from the world over. They are the ones all the glamorous hybrids are descended from. We're fortunate to have some of these botanical treasures on our list of lilies this season.

Oriental Hybrid Lilies are the now famous, very fragrant ones with large, flattened flowers such as red Star Gazer and white Casa Blanca. These are the ones now so popular in the floral trade, but are also very easy to grow. They bloom from mid-summer through early fall. Most have very large, outward-facing, fragrant flowers.

Asiatic Hybrid Lilies are today's largest group of garden lilies, quite easy to 'naturalize'. This growing group of lilies was begun by hybridizers in the US, and were first called 'Mid-Century Hybrids.' Compared to Orientals, the Asiatic Hybrid lilies bloom earlier (early to mid summer), the plants are shorter, the flowers a bit smaller, and most blooms are upward-facing and star-shaped. Some of the most famous Asiatic Hybrids are orange 'Enchantment', and the famous red, 'Gran Paradiso.'

Tiger Lilies. This group is led by the famous old orange wild lily, which used to be called Lilium tigrinum. Botanists have changed that to Lilum lancifolium, but that doesn't stop most people (including us) from using the old name 'tigrinum.' From the original orange, the hybridizers have created new colors from white to pink. All have the large flowers, spots, and tough perennial qualities of the original. (By the way, don't call any old spotted orange lily 'tiger lily'. This one is the real thing, and no lily common name is more mis-used.)

Trumpet Lilies Sometimes called 'Aurelian Hybrids' or other names, the large, tall trumpet lilies are all descended from The Regal Lily, a white wild species lily from China. All are incredibly fragrant, and wonderful for cutting. They grow tall, and often need staking, since a well-grown stalk can have over 15 huge flowers.

Associated SKUs
20FLILY3 (Bag of 3) - Out of stock.
20LILY3 (Bag of 3) - Out of stock.
Common Name Wild Lily
Botanical Name Lilium Martagon
Zones 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9
Ships As Bulb, Rhizome, Tuber
Light Requirements Full Sun, Half Sun / Half Shade
Flower Color White
Mature Height 36-40" tall
Bulb Size 16/18 cm
Bulb Spacing 8-12" apart
Planting Depth Plant 6" deep
Bloom Time Mid to late summer
Days to Bloom Blooms in 120 days
Plant Type / Life Cycle Perennial
Planting Time Spring / Summer
Soil Type Loamy Soil
Soil Moisture Average, Well Draining
Advantages Attract Butterflies, Easy to Grow, Cut Flowers
Additional Information Lilies like their feet in the shade and faces in the sun so keep them happy by planting behind or amongst other perennials for a dramatic effect.
Ships to Hawaii, Alaska & Canada No


Shipping begins in late March based on ground temperatures, warmest zones first.

As soon as your order is placed you will receive an order confirmation email that will include your shipping information. We ship perennials and spring-planted bulbs at the proper planting time for your hardiness zone. Perennials and spring-planted bulb orders will arrive separately from seeds. If your order requires more than one shipment, there is no additional shipping charge. See our shipping information page for approximate ship dates and more detailed information. If you need express shipping or have any questions, please call Customer Service toll-free at (877) 309-7333 or contact us by email.

You will receive a second email the day your order ships telling you how it has been sent. Your order is scheduled to arrive at your door, fresh and ready to plant, usually within 3-5 days of leaving our warehouse, depending on your shipping address. We pack our plants to withstand up to 10 days in transit, in the event transit is delayed. We cannot guarantee arrival on a specific day. Please make sure to open your package upon receipt and follow the instructions included.

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Reviewsby PowerReviews


by PowerReviews
American MeadowsWild Lily Bulbs Martagon

(based on 2 reviews)

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Slow to bloom


from Atlanta

Comments about American Meadows Wild Lily Bulbs Martagon:

I originally planted them in the back yard to integrate some color into my garden. They did not do well due to lack of light. I transplated to front and am waiting for blooms now.


keeping the faith


from Hartland, MI

Comments about American Meadows Wild Lily Bulbs Martagon:

The bulbs were showing an inch or two of growth when they arrived. When I planted them out they seemed to take right off and sprouted up to 4-6 inches. Then in a week or so the growth sort of just stopped and withered. I have heard that these bulbs tend to go dormant for the first year or so after they have been planted, so the jury is still out on these babies. Definetely a leap of faith. Paitence, isn't that what gardening is all about?

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Q & A

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USDA Hardiness Planting Zones

To determine if a plant is sufficiently cold hardy, the USDA created numbered zones indicating winter low temperatures; the lower the zone number the colder the winter.

  • If the coldest winter temperature expected in your area is -15°F (zone 5) then any plants rated zones 3-5 will survive the winter temperatures in your area.
  • If you live in very warm winter areas (zones 9-11) plants with zones 3-4 ratings are not recommended. The lack of freezing winter temperatures do not provide a time for winter dormancy (rest).

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