White Trillium

Video

Select a size:
Qty:
Please select a size to continue.
Shipping:
Shipping begins in late March based on ground temperatures, warmest zones first. Learn More…

Always a favorite, this Great White or Snow Trillium opens exquisite white blooms up to 5" across in mid-spring. Flowers fade to a pretty pale pink. (Trillium grandiflorum)

Zones 4 - 8
Advantages
Deer Resistant
Deer Resistant
Native
Native
Multiplies / Naturalizes
Multiplies / Naturalizes
Light Requirements
Half Sun / Half Shade
Half Sun / Half Shade
Full Shade
Full Shade
Mature Plant Size 12-14" tall, 12" wide
Bloom Time Mid to late spring
SKU 7WF3
This is the Big One. Not only in size, but also in popularity. This is always the gardeners favorite from the large trillium family, all prized wild garden flowers. The Great White or Snow Trillium opens exquisite blooms up to 5" across in mid-spring, but that's not all. It has other wonderful qualities for gardeners, too. It is one of the very few plants in the flower kingdom which actually change color during bloom. After about a week or more, each flower slowly begins to change--from snow white to a shell pink. Then in a few days more, each pink one is a dark rose as the flower fades. This is one of the true spectacles of spring, and when a drift of this beautiful flower has blooms of both white and pink, it is unforgettable.

A great companion plant is our yellow violet which blooms at exactly the same time. A bed of these Trilliums, yellow violets and a few unfurling ferns make a spring show that is truly breathtaking. Our trillium plants are nursery propagated from seed.

About the Great White Trillium There is great lore and legend about this plant, and also quite a bit of misinformation. Many people believe it is endangered which it is not. It may be protected in some places, but where it thrives, it grows in great abundance. It is the provincial flower of Ontario, and is quite common there and around the Great Lakes. It is also the official wildflower of Ohio. In New England, it is rare in all the states except Vermont, where it grows in huge drifts near Lake Champlain.

Unlike other Trilliums (such as the Red Trillium) which are solitary, standing alone in the woods, the Great White Trillium forms large drifts over the years, creating one of North Americas most beautiful spring wildflower displays.

Best of all, the Great White Trillium is quite easy to transplant and grow, making it a great choice for your wild garden.

The Trillium Tribe, and why its so famous. The classic 4-inch thick botanical reference work, Hortus Third, tells us that there are about 30 species of Trillium worldwide, but the majority of the species are native to North America. A very few originate in Japan and Korea, none in Europe. This is one reason that our colonists were so taken with these woodland beauties when they arrived. They had simply never seen anything like them.

Trilliums, as the name implies have everything in 3s--three leaves, three petals, etc. And compared to the other spring flowers that bloom when winter is finally over in our cold climates, the Trilliums are the ones with large look-at-me flowers. They were famous with the Indians before colonization, and instantly the stars of spring bloom with the colonists.

Remember, when the colonists arrived, they arrived on our east coast which was totally wooded--big, primeval old growth forest, right down to the beaches. And under these cathedral-like trees were the woodland native flowers--almost all species the Europeans had never seen. Also, this is why almost all the native flowers of our east coast are woodland plants, not meadow wildflowers. Of this famous original group of woodland wildflowers, which includes the Lady Slippers, Mayflower, Hepatica and many more, the Trilliums reigned supreme.

For centuries the flowers were picked heavily, which is unfortunate since a picked trillium is a dead trillium. But it was the clearing of the forests for farming, a necessity for the colonists, that really devastated the woodland wildflowers. We like to wring our hands about paving for interstates and new condominium projects today, but we needn't. The damage was done long ago when our ancestors cleared the eastern forests for farming. Of course, there are relatively small habitats left, and in recent years, our forested area has been enlarging, and woodland wildflower habitat has been restored in many places.

In any case, this elegant class of flowers, the Trilliums, are now recognized as precious and special, although they are not officially endangered. In many areas, Trilliums are still very common.

Wildflower gardeners love them, and it is true that most of them are not difficult to grow or transplant, and if conditions are good, they thrive. However, it does help to know the facts.

Here's how they are propagated. Trilliums such as The Great White spread very slowly by underground root stocks, and the seed produced creates new plants even more slowly. From a planted seed, it takes approximately five to nine years for a Trillium grandiflorum plant (the Great White Trillium) to bloom. So when you see a massive drift of these in spring, you know you're looking at a bunch of plants that are at least a decade old, probably much older. These plants are not daisies!

And how do they propagate themselves? Well, T. grandiflorum is one of the wildflowers whose seeds are distributed by ants. Yes, ants--not birds or bees, or the wind, but ants. This is why the species creates large close drifts over the years. Plants are never very far apart, since ants don't travel far. So each clump of T. grandiflorum you see was planted where you see it by an ant. (They carry the seeds away when they fall from the plant because the ants enjoy the sticky covering each seed case has when it falls to the ground.)

That brings us to the basic rarity of the Trilliums. A big factor is that each flower produces only one seed case when it fades. (Everybody knows that most flowers--a daisy, for example, produces hundreds of loose seeds from each flower.) So even if the ants find the sticky seed case, and take it underground where the several seeds inside can grow, there simply aren't huge numbers of white trillium seeds being planted each year. Other trillium species have various propagation strategies, but all take years and years.

Now you have some idea of the value of these beautiful plants. They are an important part of American botanical history, and deserve a place of honor in every American wildflower garden.

Here are the best known species, with a little info on each:
Trillium grandiflorum, Great White Trillium. The provincial flower of Ontario, and quite common there and around the Great Lakes. Also the official wildflower of Ohio, T. grandiflorum is native over most of the east, from Canada to Georgia, especially in neutral or non-acid soils. Large white flowers fade to pink; plants form large drifts.
Trillium erectum, Red Trillium. Also called Wake Robin and Stinking Benjamin, the second because of the flowers unpleasant odor, said to be similar to rotting meat. Propagated by flies. Red to purple flowers; plants solitary in acid or alkaline woods. Native to the eastern forests from Canada to Georgia.
Trillium undulatum, Painted Trillium. Smaller than the Great White or Red, but with one of the most beautiful flowers--white with purplish/red centers. Must have highly acidic soil; common in pine woods. Native to forests from Canada to Georgia.
Trillium Catesbaei, Rosy Trillium or Catesby Trillium. One of the first Trilliums discovered and named for Mark Catesby, the famous early British plant explorer and artist. The Rosy Trillium has somewhat smallish blooms which nod below the leaves. It is native to the Southeast, where Catesby visited.
Trillium viride var luteum, Yellow Trillium. This unusual trillium has mottled leaves and lemon yellow blooms that hold their petals high and never really open. It is often said to have a lemon scent, and is native from Kentucky south to Florida.
Trillium ovatum, Coast Trillium. This is a famous western trillium, much like T. grandiflorum in the east. Flowers are white, fading to pink. It is native from British Columbia through coastal forests all the way to central California.

Associated SKUs
1TRILG
7WF3 (Bag of 3)
1FTRIL3 (Bag of 3) - Out of stock.
Common Name Wake-Robin
Botanical Name Trillium grandiflorum
Zones 4, 5, 6, 7, 8
Light Requirements Half Sun / Half Shade, Full Shade
Flower Color White
Mature Height 12-14" tall
Estimated Mature Spread 12" wide
Bloom Time Mid to late spring
Planting Depth Plant so that the top of the root is 1" below the soil line.
Ships As Bare Root
Native Yes
Planting Time Spring / Summer
Soil Type Loamy Soil, Moist/Wet Soil
Soil Moisture Average, Moist/Wet, Well Draining
Advantages Deer Resistant, Native, Multiplies / Naturalizes
Neonicotinoid-Free Yes - Learn More
Ships to Canada No

Shipping begins in late March based on ground temperatures, warmest zones first.

As soon as your order is placed you will receive a confirmation email. You will receive a second email the day your order ships telling you how it has been sent. Some perennials are shipped as potted plants, some as perennial roots packed in peat.  The ‘Plant Information’ section describes how that item will ship. All perennials and spring-planted bulbs are packaged to withstand shipping and are fully-guaranteed. Please open upon receipt and follow the instructions included.

Perennials and spring-planted bulbs are shipped at the proper planting time for your hardiness zone. Perennial and spring-planted bulb orders will arrive separately from seeds. If your order requires more than one shipment, there is no additional shipping charge. See our shipping information page for approximate ship dates and more detailed information. If you need express shipping or have any questions, please call Customer Service toll-free at (877) 309-7333 or contact us by email.

View Shipping Rate Chart

REVIEW SNAPSHOT®

by PowerReviews
White Trillium
 
2.4

(based on 14 reviews)

Ratings Distribution

  • 5 Stars

     

    (4)

  • 4 Stars

     

    (0)

  • 3 Stars

     

    (1)

  • 2 Stars

     

    (1)

  • 1 Stars

     

    (8)

36%

of respondents would recommend this to a friend.

Pros

No Pros

Cons

No Cons

Best Uses

No Best Uses
    • Was this a gift?:
    • No (5)
    • Reviewer Profile:
    • Avid gardener (4)
    • Primary use:
    • Personal (6)

Most Liked Positive Review

 

A joy to have in a shade garden

For south IL, zone 6 white and yellow trilliums are rare. Prairie and toad trillium can be found in the woods.

I purchased red, white and yellow 3pack spring of...Read complete review

For south IL, zone 6 white and yellow trilliums are rare. Prairie and toad trillium can be found in the woods.

I purchased red, white and yellow 3pack spring of 2010.
They arrive puny, but that's understandable. I think they are very fragile plants to transplant. They did fine and went dormant as usual.

This spring 2011, they all popped up, happy as can be. The red are at a height of 10 inches the blooms haven't open yet. Only two grew.

The white "grands" are 5 inches tall and the blooms are about 3 inches wide. The white flower started out nodding and than stood up. I have 4 now.

The yellow didn't end up being yellow. They are white, which is STILL a thrill for me. I have 4 now.

They are planted under a fiddle leaf acer along with ferns, crocus and hostas. The fiddle leaf is now producing shade which is perfect timing for the flowers. It's my special garden that I always keep moist, but not damp. It has perfect soil.

Bottom line, I think they are worth the money and a pure joy to have them. Very pleased with purchase.

VS

Most Liked Negative Review

 

Whiter Trillium

We were very dissapointed with all of the trilliums in our order. None of them sprouted, some arrived rotten.

We were very dissapointed with all of the trilliums in our order. None of them sprouted, some arrived rotten.

Reviewed by 14 customers

Sort by

Displaying reviews 1-14

Back to top

 
1.0

None sprouted, though they looked alive when I planted them.

By 

from Buffalo Grove IL

About Me Avid Gardener

Verified Reviewer

Pros

    Cons

    • Dead
    • Did not sprout

    Best Uses

      Comments about White Trillium:

      Not too hopeful at this point. No sprouting at all.

      • Primary use:
      • Personal
       
      1.0

      2/3 died

      By 

      from Middleville, MI

      About Me Avid Gardener

      Pros

        Cons

        • Flimsy

        Best Uses

          Comments about White Trillium:

          Ordered 6. Received 6. Planted 6. 2 did well. The other 4 shriveled up and apparently died.

          • Primary use:
          • Personal
           
          1.0

          None came up

          By 

          from manitowoc WI

          Pros

            Cons

              Best Uses

              • Indoors

              Comments about White Trillium:

              none came up

              • Primary use:
              • Personal
               
              1.0

              Nothing grew

              By 

              from Nh

              About Me Avid Gardener

              Verified Reviewer

              Pros

                Cons

                  Best Uses

                    Comments about White Trillium:

                    Nothing grew

                     
                    2.0

                    maybe next year

                    By 

                    from colorado

                    About Me Master Gardener

                    Verified Reviewer

                    Pros

                      Cons

                        Best Uses

                        • Outdoors

                        Comments about White Trillium:

                        These were pathetic when they arrived - crowed in a plastic bag and already sprouting. Suggest Trillium should be shipped when dormant or in pots. One survived and is now dormant. Will see if it comes back. I did order three more from another supplier and they arrive in small pots and beautifully packed. They did stay healthy and are now dormant.

                        • Primary use:
                        • Personal

                        (3 of 3 customers found this review helpful)

                         
                        1.0

                        Whiter Trillium

                        By 

                        from Greenville, SC

                        Pros

                        • NA

                        Cons

                        • Did Not Sprout

                        Best Uses

                        • Shade Garden

                        Comments about White Trillium:

                        We were very dissapointed with all of the trilliums in our order. None of them sprouted, some arrived rotten.

                        • Was this a gift?:
                        • No
                         
                        3.0

                        We will have to see.

                        By 

                        from saline, mi

                        Verified Reviewer

                        Pros

                          Cons

                            Best Uses

                              Comments about White Trillium:

                              2 of 3 produced leaves

                              • Was this a gift?:
                              • No

                              (1 of 2 customers found this review helpful)

                               
                              1.0

                              Total dud

                              By 

                              from Northville MI

                              Comments about White Trillium:

                              Followed planting directions to the letter - was a bit nervous since stock didn't look very good on arrival. Total waste of time and money.

                              (1 of 1 customers found this review helpful)

                               
                              1.0

                              fizzles out

                              By 

                              from Spring valley, NY

                              Pros

                              • None

                              Cons

                              • Very Feeble

                              Best Uses

                                Comments about White Trillium:

                                The 3 roots arrived with one leaf and died within a couple of days of planting it one by one.

                                • Was this a gift?:
                                • No

                                (1 of 1 customers found this review helpful)

                                 
                                5.0

                                THE MOST RELIABLE DISTRIBUTERS OF FLOWER

                                By 

                                from LYNN MASS

                                Verified Reviewer

                                Pros

                                • Dependable Poducts
                                • On Time Delivery For Each
                                • Reasonable Prices

                                Cons

                                • none

                                Best Uses

                                • Creating A Forest Garden

                                Comments about White Trillium:

                                OVER A FIVE YEAR SPAN I HAVE NEVER BEEN DISAPPOINTED. EVEN WHEN A DELIVERY WENT ASTARY IT WAS REPLACED ALMOST OVER NIGHT AT NO ADDITIONAL COST

                                • Was this a gift?:
                                • No

                                (1 of 1 customers found this review helpful)

                                 
                                1.0

                                Disappointing

                                By 

                                from Upstate NY

                                Verified Reviewer

                                Pros

                                  Cons

                                    Best Uses

                                      Comments about White Trillium:

                                      Planted them right away, but they were too far out when they arrived, and never hardened off. They whithered and died within 2 weeks.

                                      • Was this a gift?:
                                      • No

                                      (2 of 3 customers found this review helpful)

                                       
                                      5.0

                                      A joy to have in a shade garden

                                      By 

                                      from Southern IL, zone 6

                                      Verified Reviewer

                                      Pros

                                      • Rare flower

                                      Cons

                                        Best Uses

                                          Comments about White Trillium:

                                          For south IL, zone 6 white and yellow trilliums are rare. Prairie and toad trillium can be found in the woods.

                                          I purchased red, white and yellow 3pack spring of 2010.
                                          They arrive puny, but that's understandable. I think they are very fragile plants to transplant. They did fine and went dormant as usual.

                                          This spring 2011, they all popped up, happy as can be. The red are at a height of 10 inches the blooms haven't open yet. Only two grew.

                                          The white "grands" are 5 inches tall and the blooms are about 3 inches wide. The white flower started out nodding and than stood up. I have 4 now.

                                          The yellow didn't end up being yellow. They are white, which is STILL a thrill for me. I have 4 now.

                                          They are planted under a fiddle leaf acer along with ferns, crocus and hostas. The fiddle leaf is now producing shade which is perfect timing for the flowers. It's my special garden that I always keep moist, but not damp. It has perfect soil.

                                          Bottom line, I think they are worth the money and a pure joy to have them. Very pleased with purchase.

                                          (1 of 2 customers found this review helpful)

                                           
                                          5.0

                                          Great little plant

                                          By 

                                          from Denver, Co

                                          About Me Avid Gardener

                                          Verified Reviewer

                                          Pros

                                          • Accurate Instructions
                                          • Attractive
                                          • Hardy
                                          • Healthy
                                          • Lightweight
                                          • Versatile

                                          Cons

                                            Best Uses

                                            • Garden

                                            Comments about White Trillium:

                                            This little plant is great I love watching the flowers change color. It is really thriving in my garden. I would recommend this to anyone. It's worth the money.

                                            • Primary use:
                                            • Personal

                                            (1 of 1 customers found this review helpful)

                                             
                                            5.0

                                            Trillium Grandiflorum are doing great!

                                            By 

                                            from Onsted, MI

                                            About Me Master Gardener

                                            Verified Reviewer

                                            Pros

                                            • Accurate Instructions
                                            • Hardy
                                            • Healthy

                                            Cons

                                              Best Uses

                                              • Garden

                                              Comments about White Trillium:

                                              I planted my trillium in my woodland garden last spring when I got them, mulched them and watered with all the rest of the plants in that area. This spring they came up beautifully. I am thrilled!

                                              • Primary use:
                                              • Personal

                                              Displaying reviews 1-14

                                              Back to top

                                              Plant with These

                                              • Oriental Lily Bulbs Stargazer

                                                Oriental Lily Bulbs Stargazer

                                                $9.74

                                                Learn More
                                              • All Annual Wildflower Seed Mix

                                                All Annual Wildflower Seed Mix

                                                $8.46

                                                Learn More
                                              • Astilbe Burgundy Red

                                                Astilbe Burgundy Red

                                                Regular Price: $21.98

                                                Sale $14.29

                                                Learn More

                                              USDA Hardiness Planting Zones

                                              To determine if a plant is sufficiently cold hardy, the USDA created numbered zones indicating winter low temperatures; the lower the zone number the colder the winter.

                                              • If the coldest winter temperature expected in your area is -15°F (zone 5) then any plants rated zones 3-5 will survive the winter temperatures in your area.
                                              • If you live in very warm winter areas (zones 9-11) plants with zones 3-4 ratings are not recommended. The lack of freezing winter temperatures do not provide a time for winter dormancy (rest).

                                              Find Your Planting Zone:

                                              Enter your Zip Code to find your USDA Planting Zone

                                              You are using an out-of-date browser.

                                              You will still be able to shop AmericanMeadows.com, but some functionality may not work unless you update to a modern browser. Update My Browser

                                              ×

                                              Please wait...

                                              Item added to your cart

                                              has been added to your cart.