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ALASKA HAWAII MIDWEST NORTHEAST PACIFIC NORTHWEST SOUTHEAST SOUTHWEST WEST Zone 1 Zone 2 Zone 3 Zone 4 Zone 5 Zone 6 Zone 7 Zone 8 Zone 9 Zone 10
What is this To help gardeners understand which plants will grow well for them, the entire USA has been segmented into ‘Plant Hardiness Zones’.

June Gardening: What To Plant

Plant Cosmos and Sunflowers in June for blooms all the way into fall.

Many gardeners think of Memorial Day as the cutoff for planting in the garden, but that’s not the case! There is still plenty of time to plant in June for strong, healthy plants and vibrant blooms this season. Besides planting, there are also a variety of garden chores and work to do in the garden in June. We'll outline these by region, focusing on the Northeast, Southeast, Midwest, and West, as well as give some of our favorite varieties for June planting.

June Gardening: Second Season of Annual Blooms

Annual wildflowers can also be seeded on the later side of the planting season to enjoy a round of blooms as other plants begin to fade. Annual wildflowers planted now will bloom a little bit later in the season, extending your garden into the fall. Marigolds, Cosmos, Zinnias, and Sunflowers are perfect examples – they usually burn out by late summer, but if planted now will last well past Labor Day, offering up a rainbow of late-season blooms.

Annual Wildflower Seeds

  • All Annual Wildflower Seed Mix

    Starting at $9.95

    Per 1/4 Pound

  • Zinnia Seeds

    Starting at $9.95

    Per 1/4 Pound

  • Red Poppy Seeds

    Starting at $14.95

    Per 1/4 Pound

  • Cosmos Seeds

    Starting at $9.95

    Per 1/4 Pound


Our Summer Splash Mix is great for June planting. It has 49 heat-tolerant species that bloom all season long.

Summer Splash Mix

Our specially formulated Summer Splash Wildflower Mix is designed for June planting. It has 49 different species (38 annuals and 11 perennials) that are heat tolerant, coming up and blooming just weeks after planting and lasting well into the fall. If you're seeing bare spots in your garden or meadow but don’t want to add perennials or bulbs, this mixture is the perfect solution for easy, spectacular color this year.

Learn more about planting wildflowers here.

Perennial and Biennial Wildflowers

Perennial and biennial wildflowers need a full season to establish themselves in your garden or meadow before they bloom. By planting in June, you’ll be giving these seeds an entire season to get settled before winter sets in, ensuring strong plants that will burst with color in spring.

Perennial Wildflower Seeds

  • Black Eyed Susan Seeds

    Starting at $12.95

    Per 1/4 Pound

  • Perennial Lupine Seeds

    Starting at $11.95

    Per 1/4 Pound

  • Gloriosa Daisy Seeds

    Starting at $10.95

    Per 1/4 Pound

  • Purple Coneflower Seeds

    Starting at $12.95

    Per 1/4 Pound


Dahlias are tropical bulbs, meaning they thrive in high heat and full sun.

June Gardening: Perennials and Bulbs

Planting perennials in June really depends on where you live. Here in Vermont, we still have plenty of time to get perennials in the garden as our ground temperatures have recently warmed and it’s still going down to the 50’s at night. Depending on your hardiness zone, you may want to hold off until the fall planting season to add perennials to the garden.

Summer-Blooming Bulbs such as Dahlias, Gladiolus, Canna Lilies and more are actually tropical, meaning they thrive in hot climates with full sun. This makes them a great candidate for summer planting, but just make sure you have enough time before the frost for these beauties to grow and bloom.

Summer-Blooming Bulbs

  • Belladonna Lily or Naked Ladies

    Starting at $29.98

    Sale: $22.49

    Per Bag of 1


June Gardening: Second Season of Vegetable Crops

Although June is too late to plant long-season varieties such as Tomatoes and Eggplant from seed, you can still plant Basil, Carrots, Beets, Lettuce and more for a second harvest in the vegetable garden. In fact, many lettuce varieties can be sown throughout the season for multiple harvests.

June Planning And Designing

As your gardens fill in and take their shape in June, this is a perfect month to walk around and assess your gardens. Are there spots where you could use more height, color, or fragrance? Did your daylilies multiply the past year and are they too large? Now is the time to take note of this to add more varieties to the garden and also identify which varieties need to be divided/replanted in the fall.

june planting: garden

Walk around and take note of your gardens in June. Where could you use more color? Which varieties should be divided and re-planted?

June Gardening Chores By Region

June is often the month when gardens start really filling in and becoming lush, offering up plentiful blooms and interest. Because of this, June is also an important month to be maintaining and working out in the garden. We’ll discuss chores specific to region, but there are several things everyone — no matter your location — should be doing in June.

  • Weed regularly. It’s best to spend a few minutes several times a week weeding than letting it build up and become overwhelming.
  • Work in the early morning or early evening. June can be quite hot in many parts of the country, so try to get out in the garden in the coolest parts of the morning or in the early evening.
  • Keep new plants watered regularly. Water the root systems in the early morning, avoiding foliage, to help prevent burning.
  • Apply mid-season fertilizer if needed.

June Gardening Chores: Northeast

In the Northeast, June is often the true awakening of the garden and many gardeners don’t get around to planting until the beginning of the month. Here are some garden chores for the Northeast in June:

  • Add tender annual wildflowers and bulbs to the garden once the danger of frost has passed.
  • Deadhead any spent spring-flowering bulbs like Daffodils and Tulips, leaving most of the foliage in tact until they die back.
  • Weed and add mulch to garden beds as needed.
  • Give your houseplants a much-needed dose of sunlight and bring them outdoors for the summer.
  • Make sure plants that need support or trellises — like Clematis and Peonies — have these in the beginning of the season.
  • Edge beds if necessary for a clean look.

June Gardening Chores: Southeast

June temperatures in the Southeast can be high, so there are several things to keep up with in the June garden:

  • Water, water, water (when possible)! Water the root systems in the early morning, avoiding foliage, to help prevent burning. If you have water restrictions in your area, choose one day per week to give everything a good soaking.
  • Fertilize any potted annuals or houseplants that are outside to help promote strong, healthy growth and blooms.
  • Raise the height of your lawn mower by one inch. Cutting your grass a little higher in June will help your lawn tolerate the heat and dry weather.
  • Deadhead long-lasting annuals like Marigolds, Geranium, and Zinnia to promote more blooms.
june planting: marigolds

Deadhead annuals like Marigolds as they finish blooming to promote long-lasting flowering.

June Gardening Chores: Midwest

The Midwest often has a cool spring, with June being the real start of the gardening season. Here is what to do in your garden in June:

  • Add tender annual wildflowers and bulbs to the garden once the danger of frost has passed.
  • Give your houseplants a much-needed dose of sunlight and bring them outdoors for the summer.
  • Prune spring-flowering trees and shrubs as they finish blooming.
  • Weed and add mulch to garden beds as needed.
  • Make sure plants that need support or trellises — like Clematis and Peonies — have these in the beginning of the season.
  • Deadhead any spent spring-flowering bulbs like Daffodils and Tulips, leaving most of the foliage in tact until they die back

June Gardening Chores: West

Depending on your area, the Western part of the country can be just warming up in June (Oregon) or have been warm for months (California). Here are some things you can do in the garden in June:

  • Prune spring-flowering trees and shrubs as they finish blooming.
  • Add organic mulch to your garden beds to help retain moisture.
  • Add tender annual wildflowers and bulbs to the garden once the danger of frost has passed.
  • Keep up with weeds by heading out into the garden at least once per week. This is important as weeds take away important nutrients from your plants.
  • Make sure to water potted plants and raised beds frequently; they tend to dry out quicker than in-ground gardens.
  • Give your houseplants a much-needed dose of sunlight and bring them outdoors for the summer.
june planting: sedum

Sedum is one of our favorite drought tolerant varieties. Bonus: pollinators love it!

The Summer Solstice In June

We enjoy the longest day of the year in June, which also means it is the strongest sun we'll have all summer long. This is a great time to think about ways you can help conserve water in your garden. Does your mulch need a refresher? If you're living in a drought-prone area, you may want to think about slowly overhauling your garden and adding in low-maintenance, drought-tolerant varieties that don't require a ton of supplemental water. Daylilies, Sedum, Lavender, and Coreopsis are some of our favorite perennials that are sun-loving, drought tolerant and low maintenance.

June is one of the busiest and most fun times in the garden. With just a little work and planting, you'll be able to enjoy a lush, flowering garden well through the fall months.

Browse Drought Tolerant Perennials

  • Giant Black Eyed Susan

    $14.98

    Sale: $12.49

    Per Plant - 2.5" pot

  • Bluebeard Snow Fairy

    $15.98

    Sale: $11.99

    Per Plant - 2.5" pot

  • Bluebeard Longwood Blue

    $25.98

    Sale: $21.99

    Per Plant - 4" pot

  • Daylily Double Dream

    $14.98

    Sale: $12.99

    Per Bag of 1

  • Echinacea Butterfly Kisses

    $29.98

    Sale: $25.49

    Per Plant - 3" pot


2 thoughts on “June Gardening: What To Plant”

  • Crickets

    I feel overwhelmed right now trying to take care of our 3 acres! Lots of new specimens to plant, first-season transplants to water, soooo many weeds to pull, mulch to lay...I love being out there, it's just that sometimes I wish there were only ONE chore at a time to focus on. ;) I feel like I'm trying to do it all, and not doing any of it well :P

    Reply
    • Gloria

      crickets: maybe we should come here often- for the 'Oh, there's so much to do' Club! Feel the same, many (most) days!

      Reply
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