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Phlox Pixie Twinkle

SKU: AM014604
$11.95
per Plant - 3" Pot
Shipping:
No longer available this season.
Overview
Phlox Pixie Twinkle features pretty light pink cluster flowers with dark pink centers. Pixie Twinkle is fragrant, and attracts butterflies to your garden. This phlox has good mildew resistance and is an excellent cutting flower. Container planting, border edging and mass plantings are the best use for Pixie Twinkle. (Phlox paniculata)
key features
Botanical Name
Phlox paniculata
Advantages
Native, Attracts Butterflies, Easy To Grow, Cut Flowers
Growing Zones
Zone 4, Zone 5, Zone 6, Zone 7, Zone 8
Light Requirements
Full Sun
Soil Moisture
Average
Mature Height
16-18" tall
Mature Spread
16-20" wide
Bloom Time
Mid to late summer

Description

Why Phlox should be the backbone of your garden: They're beautiful. They're easy. And no matter what else you grow, you cant beat their display. In fact, probably no group of plants adds more color to American perennial gardens than phlox. They just happen to be the perfect plant--tall enough to show the flowers over the others, heavy bloomers at the right time with big colorful flower heads, and best of all--a nice long season of bloom. Most every good perennial garden has an extra measure of phlox plants. In yours, plant a few and then notice which do the best, and then get more of those. Repeated color groups in the garden assure the great colorful display everyone wants.

Unlike years past, today's phlox plants have been bred to resist mildew. While this used to pose a significant problem, mildew-tainted leaves are no longer an annoying part of being a phlox grower. You can now enjoy these beautiful blooms alongside strong and healthy foliage all season long.

Need a big bouquet? Just of few of these multi-flowered stems will do the trick, with lovely fragrance and fabulous color. Add a few lilies, and you have a knock-out arrangement anyone can do. So be sure to grow enough phlox for cutting, too.

After bloom, simply cut down the flower stems about halfway, (It's not botanically correct, but lots of gardeners snap them; the strong stiff stems snap off easily) and your tough, hardy plants will be ready to light up for you again next year.

Yes, they're North American Natives. Very few American gardeners know it, but almost all phlox species are North American wildflowers, as native as our goldenrods and black-eyed susans. But since we ignored them for years, European hybridizers (mostly German) took the wild versions back to Europe and created the fantastic hybrids we all enjoy today.