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Purple Coneflower Seeds

SKU: AM015956
Choose a Size:
Buy in Bulk & Save!
1/4 pound
$19.95
1 pound
$49.95
5 pounds $47.45/lb
$237.25
10 pounds $44.95/lb
$449.50
Shipping:
Most orders ship within 2 business days.
Overview
Purple Coneflower, also called Echinacea, is famous across the country for its stunning purple flowers and golden center cones. A perennial butterfly and bee magnet, this native wildflower is extremely easy to grow and looks equally at home in the garden, meadow, or vase. Leave your Purple Coneflower planting in place over the winter to attract goldfinches and other songbirds. 100% pure, non-GMO, neonicotinoid-free seeds are guaranteed to grow.
key features
Botanical Name
Echinacea purpurea
Advantages
Native, Bee Friendly, Attracts Butterflies, Attracts Birds, Deer Resistant, Easy To Grow, Low Maintenance, Cut Flowers, Fragrant, Winter Interest, Mass Plantings, Container Planting
Growing Zones
Zone 3, Zone 4, Zone 5, Zone 6, Zone 7, Zone 8
Seed Life Cycle
Perennial
Light Requirements
Full Sun, Half Sun / Half Shade
Soil Moisture
Dry, Average
Mature Height
24-36" tall
Seed Coverage
1/4 lb covers 1,210 sq ft.
1 lb covers 4,840 sq ft.
5 lbs covers 24,200 sq ft.
10 lbs covers 1 acre
Bloom Time
Summer

Description

Purple coneflower has always been a star in plains plantings. It is tough, great for cutting, and one of our most beautiful native wildflowers. Once plants with their dark green, deeply-veined leaves are established, it can be the most important color-maker in a mature meadow in mid-season. But today, it has even further importance. Under its botanical genus name, Echinacea, it has gained worldwide popularity as the No. 1 herbal medicinal. Long a favorite of Native Americans in treating snakebite, echinacea today is used in tablet and other forms to ward off colds and flus, and even to support the immune system. Millions of Americans now take pills or potions containing echinacea daily.

Echinacea purpurea was featured as a Pollinator Favorite in a Mt Cuba Center Trial Garden Research Report. These reports evaluate native plants and related cultivars for horticultural and ecological value, highlighting the ecosystem services they provide.