Skip to Content
American Meadows (USD) English
Home / Flower Bulbs / Black Eye Asiatic Lily Bulbs

Black Eye Asiatic Lily Bulbs

SKU: AM015605
$14.98
per Bag of 3
Shipping:
No longer available this season.
Overview
From its slender, refined stalks, 'Black Eye' Asiatic Lily produces unique blossoms with white tips and dark, purple-black centers. Reknowned for its unusual presentation, 'Black Eye' is an eye-catching lily, perfect for cut flower bouquets and adding unexpected interest to beds and borders. Growing to just over 3 feet tall, 'Black Eye' is a narrow plant that works well in small spaces and tolerates part shade. (Lilium)
key features
Botanical Name
Lilium asiaticum Black Eye
Advantages
Easy To Grow, Cut Flowers, Container Planting, Small Spaces
Growing Zones
Zone 3, Zone 4, Zone 5, Zone 6, Zone 7, Zone 8, Zone 9
Light Requirements
Full Sun, Half Sun / Half Shade
Soil Moisture
Average
Mature Height
32-40" tall
Bulb Spacing
3 bulbs per sq. ft. 8-12" apart
Bloom Time
Early to mid summer

Description

Growing Lilies: True lilies (which don't include daylilies and others which are not in the genus Lilium) are easy to grow today, and more popular every season. Since they are upright and take practically no space at ground level, it's easy to plant lilies between other established perennials and shrubs. Most can also tolerate some shade, which adds versatility for the gardener. There are many lily groups, but to keep it simple, we will consider only a few of the main types that are important to gardeners. Each lily we ship includes complete instructions for planting. So don't hesitate. You can easily bring the spectacular beauty of lily flowers to any summer meadow or garden.

'Wild' Lilies or 'Species' Lilies These are the true wildflowers from the world over. They are the ones all the glamorous hybrids are descended from. We're fortunate to have some of these botanical treasures on our list of lilies this season.

Oriental Hybrid Lilies are the now famous, very fragrant ones with large, flattened flowers such as red Stargazer and white Casa Blanca. These are the ones now so popular in the floral trade, but are also very easy to grow. They bloom from mid-summer through early fall. Most have very large, outward-facing, fragrant flowers.

Asiatic Hybrid Lilies are today's largest group of garden lilies, quite easy to 'naturalize'. This growing group of lilies was begun by hybridizers in the US, and were first called 'Mid-Century Hybrids.' Compared to Orientals, the Asiatic Hybrid lilies bloom earlier (early to mid summer), the plants are shorter, the flowers a bit smaller, and most blooms are upward-facing and star-shaped. Some of the most famous Asiatic Hybrids are yellow 'Connecticut King,' and the famous red, 'Gran Paradiso.'

Tiger Lilies. This group is led by the famous old orange wild lily, which used to be called Lilium tigrinum. Botanists have changed that to Lilum lancifolium, but that doesn't stop most people (including us) from using the old name 'tigrinum.' From the original orange, the hybridizers have created new colors from white to pink. All have the large flowers, black spots, and tough perennial qualities of the original. (By the way, don't call any old spotted orange lily 'tiger lily'. This one is the real thing, and no lily common name is more mis-used.)

Trumpet Lilies Sometimes called 'Aurelian Hybrids' or other names, the large, tall trumpet lilies are all descended from The Regal Lily, a white wild species lily from China. All are incredibly fragrant, and wonderful for cutting. They grow tall, and often need staking, since a well-grown stalk can have over 15 huge flowers.