Many gardeners think of Memorial Day as the cutoff for planting in the garden, but that’s not the case! There is still plenty of time to plant in June for strong, healthy plants and vibrant blooms this season. Besides planting, there are some important steps for garden care in June. We'll outline these by region, focusing on the Northeast, Southeast, Midwest, and West, as well as give some of our favorite flowers for June planting.

Planting In June

 

Our Spring Into Summer Mix is great for June planting. It has 49 heat-tolerant species that bloom all season long.

Planting Wildflowers

Annual wildflowers can be seeded on the later side of the planting season to enjoy a round of blooms as other plants begin to fade. Annual wildflowers planted now will bloom a little bit later in the season, extending your garden into the fall. Marigolds, Cosmos, Zinnias, and Sunflowers are perfect examples – they usually burn out by late summer, but if planted now will last well past Labor Day, offering up a rainbow of late-season blooms.

Tips For Planting Wildflowers In Late Spring & Summer:

  • It will be important to keep your seeds and soil well-watered for the first 4-6 weeks.
  • In warm, dry areas, as the weather heats up, it can help to plan your planting around rain in the forecast.

Our specially formulated Spring Into Summer Wildflower Seed Mix is designed for June planting. It has over 40 species, primarily annual wildfloweres, that are heat tolerant. These flowers will blooming just weeks after planting and last well into the fall. If you're seeing bare spots in your garden or meadow, this mixture is the perfect solution for easy, spectacular color this year. Our one-of-a-kind mix is available for a limtied time only each spring season. 

Perennial and biennial wildflowers need a full season to establish themselves in your garden or meadow before they bloom. By planting in June, you’ll be giving these seeds an entire season to get settled before winter sets in, ensuring strong plants that will burst with color the following spring. Shop the right wildflower seeds for your area!

Learn More: How To Grow Wildflowers

 

Shop Annual Wildflowers

  1. Pink Lemonade Zinnia Mix, Zinnia elegans Pink Lemonade Mix

    Our Pink Lemonade Zinnia Seed Mix blooms all summer, offering a delicious nectar source for pollinators and hummingbirds. Easy-to-grow Zinnias in cherry red, pink, and lemon-lime add...

    Learn More
    Pink Lemonade Zinnia Seed Mix Pink Lemonade Zinnia Mix Zinnia elegans Pink Lemonade Mix
    As low as $12.95 Sale $12.31
    Per 1/4 Pound
    Our Pink Lemonade Zinnia Seed Mix blooms all summer, offering a delicious nectar source for pollinators and hummingbirds. Easy-to-grow Zinnias in cherry red, pink, and lemon-lime add sweet color to flowerpots, garden beds, and wildflower meadows. All of the seed we carry at American Meadows is non-GMO, neonicotinoid-free, and guaranteed to grow. Annual.
    Learn More
  2. Double Sun Sunflower, Helianthus annuus Double Sun

    Double Sun Sunflowers feature double solid gold petals surrounding lime green centers. Large 7-9-inch-wide blooms add cheerful color and unusual texture to your garden and cut flower...

    Learn More
    Sunflower Seeds Double Sun Double Sun Sunflower Helianthus annuus Double Sun
    As low as $19.95 Sale $18.96
    Per 1/4 Pound
    Double Sun Sunflowers feature double solid gold petals surrounding lime green centers. Large 7-9-inch-wide blooms add cheerful color and unusual texture to your garden and cut flower arrangements. Plant to feeds bees, butterflies, and birds. All of the seed we carry at American Meadows is non-GMO, neonicotinoid-free, and guaranteed to grow. Annual. (Helianthus)
    Learn More
  3. Crimson Velvet Sunflower, Helianthus annuus Crimson Velvet growing in meadow

    Crimson Velvet Sunflowers feature deep brown centers surrounded by petals in a matching hue, tipped with soft yellow as if dipped in sunshine. This striking heirloom variety is easy ...

    Learn More
    Sunflower Seeds Crimson Velvet Crimson Velvet Sunflower Helianthus annuus Crimson Velvet
    As low as $19.95 Sale $18.96
    Per 1/4 Pound
    Crimson Velvet Sunflowers feature deep brown centers surrounded by petals in a matching hue, tipped with soft yellow as if dipped in sunshine. This striking heirloom variety is easy to grow, with large flowers up to 8 inches wide that create a landing pad for pollinators and birds. This of the seed we carry at American Meadows is non-GMO, neonicotinoid-free, and guaranteed to grow. Annual. (Helianthus)
    Learn More
  4. Pink and Red and White Cosmos Seeds, Cosmos bipinnatus

    Cosmos lights up the garden or meadow in midsummer with pink, crimson and white flowers that hold until frost on tall plants. Attractive to both butterflies and hummingbirds, its col...

    Learn More
    Cosmos Seeds Cosmos Cosmos bipinnatus
    As low as $12.95 Sale $12.31
    Per 1/4 Pound
    Cosmos lights up the garden or meadow in midsummer with pink, crimson and white flowers that hold until frost on tall plants. Attractive to both butterflies and hummingbirds, its colorful and abundant blooms are easy to grow in any region. Cosmos is a popular cutting flower with ferny foliage and strong stems and looks lovely planted along a fenceline. All of the seed we carry at American Meadows is non-GMO, neonicotinoid-free and guaranteed to grow.
    Learn More
Dahlias are tropical bulbs, so they thrive in high heat and full sun.

Planting Perennials and Bulbs

Planting perennials in June really depends on where you live. Here in the northeast, we still have plenty of time to get perennials in the garden as our ground temperatures have recently warmed and it’s still going down to the 50’s at night. Depending on your hardiness zone, you may want to hold off until the fall planting season to add perennials to the garden. 

Summer-Blooming Bulbs such as Dahlias, Gladiolus, Canna Lilies and more are actually tropical, meaning they thrive in hot climates with full sun. This makes them a great candidate for summer planting, but just make sure you have enough time before the frost for these beauties to grow and bloom.

A Second Season of Vegetables

Although June is too late to plant long-season varieties such as Tomatoes and Eggplant from seed, you can still plant Basil, Carrots, Beets, Lettuce and more for a second harvest in the vegetable garden. In fact, many lettuce varieties can be sown throughout the season for multiple harvests.

Planning and Garden Design

As your gardens fill in and take their shape in June, this is a perfect month to walk around and assess your gardens. Are there spots where you could use more height, color, or fragrance? Did your daylilies multiply the past year and are they too large? Now is the time to take note of this to add more varieties to the garden and also identify which varieties need to be divided or replanted in the fall.

june planting: garden
Walk around and take note of your gardens in June. Where could you use more color? Which varieties should be divided and re-planted?

June Gardening Tips By Region

June is often the month when gardens start really filling in and becoming lush, offering up plentiful blooms and interest. That usually means that June is also an important month to be maintaining and working in the garden!

Here are several things everyone should be doing in June - in any location.

  • Weed regularly. It’s best to spend a few minutes several times a week weeding than letting it build up and become overwhelming.
  • Work in the early morning or early evening. June can be quite hot in many parts of the country, so try to get out in the garden in the coolest parts of the morning or in the early evening.
  • Keep new plants watered regularly. Water the root systems in the early morning, avoiding foliage, to help prevent burning.
  • Apply mid-season fertilizer if needed.
  • Deadhead annuals as they finish blooming to promote long-lasting flowering.

June Gardening In The Northeast

In the Northeast, June is often the true awakening of the garden, and many gardeners don’t get around to planting until the beginning of the month. Here are some garden chores for the Northeast in June:

  • Add tender annual wildflowers and bulbs to the garden once the danger of frost has passed.
  • Deadhead any spent spring-flowering bulbs like Daffodils and Tulips, leaving most of the foliage in tact until they die back.
  • Weed and add mulch to garden beds as needed.
  • Give your houseplants a much-needed dose of sunlight and bring them outdoors for the summer.
  • Make sure plants that need support or trellises — like Clematis and Peonies — have these in the beginning of the season.
  • Edge beds if necessary for a clean look.

June Gardening In The Southeast

June temperatures in the Southeast can be high, so there are several things to keep up with in the June garden:

  • Water, water, water (when possible)! Water the root systems in the early morning, avoiding foliage, to help prevent burning. If you have water restrictions in your area, choose one day per week to give everything a good soaking.
  • Fertilize any potted annuals or houseplants that are outside to help promote strong, healthy growth and blooms.
  • Raise the height of your lawn mower by one inch. Cutting your grass a little higher in June will help your lawn tolerate the heat and dry weather.
  • Deadhead long-lasting annuals like Marigolds, Geranium, and Zinnia to promote more blooms.
june planting: marigolds
Deadhead annuals like Marigolds as they finish blooming to promote long-lasting flowering.

June Gardening In The Midwest

The Midwest often has a cool spring, with June being the real start of the gardening season. Here is what to do in your garden in June:

  • Add tender annual wildflowers and bulbs to the garden once the danger of frost has passed.
  • Give your houseplants a much-needed dose of sunlight and bring them outdoors for the summer.
  • Prune spring-flowering trees and shrubs as they finish blooming.
  • Weed and add mulch to garden beds as needed.
  • Make sure plants that need support or trellises — like Clematis and Peonies — have these in the beginning of the season.
  • Deadhead any spent spring-flowering bulbs like Daffodils and Tulips, leaving most of the foliage in tact until they die back

June Gardening In The West

Depending on your area, the Western part of the country can be just warming up in June, or have been warm for months. Here are some things you can do in the garden in June:

  • Prune spring-flowering trees and shrubs as they finish blooming.
  • Add organic mulch to your garden beds to help retain moisture.
  • Add tender annual wildflowers and bulbs to the garden once the danger of frost has passed.
  • Keep up with weeds by heading out into the garden at least once per week. This is important as weeds take away important nutrients from your plants.
  • Make sure to water potted plants and raised beds frequently; they tend to dry out quicker than in-ground gardens.
  • Give your houseplants a much-needed dose of sunlight and bring them outdoors for the summer.
june planting: sedum
Sedum is one of our favorite drought tolerant varieties. Bonus: pollinators love it!

The Summer Solstice In June

We enjoy the longest day of the year in June! June is one of the busiest and most fun times in the garden. With just a little work and planting, you'll be able to enjoy a lush, flowering garden well through the fall months.

June also means some of the strongest sun we'll have all summer long. This is a great time to think about ways you can help conserve water in your garden. Does your mulch need a refresher? If you're living in a drought-prone area, you may want to think about slowly overhauling your garden and adding in low-maintenance, drought-tolerant varieties that don't require a ton of supplemental water. Daylilies, Sedum, Lavender, and Coreopsis are some of our favorite perennials that are sun-loving, drought tolerant and low maintenance.

 

Shop Drought Tolerant Wildflower Seeds

  1. Dry Area Wildflower Seed Mix

    Our Dry Area Mix is perfect for areas that are out of the way or regions that have water restrictions. It contains 25 different wildflowers, both annuals and perennials, that are dro...

    Learn More
    Dry Area Wildflower Seed Mix Dry Area Wildflower Seed Mix
    As low as $11.95
    Per 1/4 Pound
    Our Dry Area Mix is perfect for areas that are out of the way or regions that have water restrictions. It contains 25 different wildflowers, both annuals and perennials, that are drought tolerant. This mix is designed to bloom all season long, year after year - It will burst into blooms the first year with the annual wildflowers and provide color in years after with the perennials.
    Learn More
  2. Perennial Lupine Seeds

    A field of Lupine is an amazing sight, with spiky blooms of saturated indigo-blue that last from late spring to summer. Combine them with later-blooming flowers (like Shasta Daisy an...

    Learn More
    Perennial Lupine Seeds Perennial Lupine Lupinus perennis
    As low as $17.95 Sale $17.06
    Per 1/4 Pound
    A field of Lupine is an amazing sight, with spiky blooms of saturated indigo-blue that last from late spring to summer. Combine them with later-blooming flowers (like Shasta Daisy and Rudbeckia) for an extended season of color. Growing to be about 12-36” tall, Lupine is a great choice for the front of the meadow or garden bed. Extremely easy to grow and deer resistant, this perennial flower blooms year after year. Seeds are 100% pure, non-GMO, neonicotinoid-free and guaranteed to grow.
    Learn More
  3. Eastern Xeriscape Wildflower Seed Mix

    This mix of 16 native wildflowers, including Purple Coneflower, Wild Lupine, Scarlet Sage and more, is for areas in the eastern U.S. and eastern Canada where water conservation is de...

    Learn More
    Eastern Xeriscape Wildflower Seed Mix Eastern Xeriscape Wildflower Seed Mix
    As low as $15.95
    Per 1/4 Pound
    This mix of 16 native wildflowers, including Purple Coneflower, Wild Lupine, Scarlet Sage and more, is for areas in the eastern U.S. and eastern Canada where water conservation is desired. This long-lasting mixture adds colorful blooms in the first season and for years to come. This mixture is also beneficial to the pollinators native to your region and will attract wildlife to your garden or meadow. All of the seed we handle at American Meadows is non-GMO, neonicotinoid-free and guaranteed to grow.
    Learn More
  4. Western Xeriscape Wildflower Seed Mix

    Comprised of 18 wildflowers that are native to the Western part of the U.S. and Canada, including Blanket Flower, California Poppy, Arroyo Lupine and more, this mixture is the perfec...

    Learn More
    Western Xeriscape Wildflower Seed Mix Western Xeriscape Wildflower Seed Mix
    As low as $15.95
    Per 1/4 Pound
    Comprised of 18 wildflowers that are native to the Western part of the U.S. and Canada, including Blanket Flower, California Poppy, Arroyo Lupine and more, this mixture is the perfect choice where water conservation is desired. These native varieties require little watering and are hardy, blooming in the first year and coming back year after year. This mixture also attracts pollinators and thrives in full sun. All of the seed we handle at American Meadows is non-GMO, neonicotinoid-free and guaranteed to grow.
    Learn More

by Amanda

Plant Cosmos and Sunflowers in June for blooms all the way into fall.

Many gardeners think of Memorial Day as the cutoff for planting in the garden, but that’s not the case! There is still plenty of time to plant in June for strong, healthy plants and vibrant blooms this season. Besides planting, there are also a variety of garden chores and work to do in the garden in June. We'll outline these by region, focusing on the Northeast, Southeast, Midwest, and West, as well as give some of our favorite varieties for June planting.

June Gardening: Second Season of Annual Blooms

Annual wildflowers can also be seeded on the later side of the planting season to enjoy a round of blooms as other plants begin to fade. Annual wildflowers planted now will bloom a little bit later in the season, extending your garden into the fall. Marigolds, Cosmos, Zinnias, and Sunflowers are perfect examples – they usually burn out by late summer, but if planted now will last well past Labor Day, offering up a rainbow of late-season blooms.

  1. Pink Lemonade Zinnia Mix, Zinnia elegans Pink Lemonade Mix

    Our Pink Lemonade Zinnia Seed Mix blooms all summer, offering a delicious nectar source for pollinators and hummingbirds. Easy-to-grow Zinnias in cherry red, pink, and lemon-lime add...

    Learn More
    Pink Lemonade Zinnia Seed Mix Pink Lemonade Zinnia Mix Zinnia elegans Pink Lemonade Mix
    As low as $12.95 Sale $12.31
    Per 1/4 Pound
    Our Pink Lemonade Zinnia Seed Mix blooms all summer, offering a delicious nectar source for pollinators and hummingbirds. Easy-to-grow Zinnias in cherry red, pink, and lemon-lime add sweet color to flowerpots, garden beds, and wildflower meadows. All of the seed we carry at American Meadows is non-GMO, neonicotinoid-free, and guaranteed to grow. Annual.
    Learn More
  2. Double Sun Sunflower, Helianthus annuus Double Sun

    Double Sun Sunflowers feature double solid gold petals surrounding lime green centers. Large 7-9-inch-wide blooms add cheerful color and unusual texture to your garden and cut flower...

    Learn More
    Sunflower Seeds Double Sun Double Sun Sunflower Helianthus annuus Double Sun
    As low as $19.95 Sale $18.96
    Per 1/4 Pound
    Double Sun Sunflowers feature double solid gold petals surrounding lime green centers. Large 7-9-inch-wide blooms add cheerful color and unusual texture to your garden and cut flower arrangements. Plant to feeds bees, butterflies, and birds. All of the seed we carry at American Meadows is non-GMO, neonicotinoid-free, and guaranteed to grow. Annual. (Helianthus)
    Learn More
  3. Crimson Velvet Sunflower, Helianthus annuus Crimson Velvet growing in meadow

    Crimson Velvet Sunflowers feature deep brown centers surrounded by petals in a matching hue, tipped with soft yellow as if dipped in sunshine. This striking heirloom variety is easy ...

    Learn More
    Sunflower Seeds Crimson Velvet Crimson Velvet Sunflower Helianthus annuus Crimson Velvet
    As low as $19.95 Sale $18.96
    Per 1/4 Pound
    Crimson Velvet Sunflowers feature deep brown centers surrounded by petals in a matching hue, tipped with soft yellow as if dipped in sunshine. This striking heirloom variety is easy to grow, with large flowers up to 8 inches wide that create a landing pad for pollinators and birds. This of the seed we carry at American Meadows is non-GMO, neonicotinoid-free, and guaranteed to grow. Annual. (Helianthus)
    Learn More
  4. Pink and Red and White Cosmos Seeds, Cosmos bipinnatus

    Cosmos lights up the garden or meadow in midsummer with pink, crimson and white flowers that hold until frost on tall plants. Attractive to both butterflies and hummingbirds, its col...

    Learn More
    Cosmos Seeds Cosmos Cosmos bipinnatus
    As low as $12.95 Sale $12.31
    Per 1/4 Pound
    Cosmos lights up the garden or meadow in midsummer with pink, crimson and white flowers that hold until frost on tall plants. Attractive to both butterflies and hummingbirds, its colorful and abundant blooms are easy to grow in any region. Cosmos is a popular cutting flower with ferny foliage and strong stems and looks lovely planted along a fenceline. All of the seed we carry at American Meadows is non-GMO, neonicotinoid-free and guaranteed to grow.
    Learn More
Our Summer Splash Mix is great for June planting. It has 49 heat-tolerant species that bloom all season long.

Summer Splash Mix

Our specially formulated Summer Splash Wildflower Mix is designed for June planting. It has 49 different species (38 annuals and 11 perennials) that are heat tolerant, coming up and blooming just weeks after planting and lasting well into the fall. If you're seeing bare spots in your garden or meadow but don’t want to add perennials or bulbs, this mixture is the perfect solution for easy, spectacular color this year.

Learn more about planting wildflowers here.

Perennial and Biennial Wildflowers

Perennial and biennial wildflowers need a full season to establish themselves in your garden or meadow before they bloom. By planting in June, you’ll be giving these seeds an entire season to get settled before winter sets in, ensuring strong plants that will burst with color in spring.

Dahlias are tropical bulbs, meaning they thrive in high heat and full sun.

June Gardening: Perennials and Bulbs

Planting perennials in June really depends on where you live. Here in Vermont, we still have plenty of time to get perennials in the garden as our ground temperatures have recently warmed and it’s still going down to the 50’s at night. Depending on your hardiness zone, you may want to hold off until the fall planting season to add perennials to the garden.

Summer-Blooming Bulbs such as Dahlias, Gladiolus, Canna Lilies and more are actually tropical, meaning they thrive in hot climates with full sun. This makes them a great candidate for summer planting, but just make sure you have enough time before the frost for these beauties to grow and bloom.

June Gardening: Second Season of Vegetable Crops

Although June is too late to plant long-season varieties such as Tomatoes and Eggplant from seed, you can still plant Basil, Carrots, Beets, Lettuce and more for a second harvest in the vegetable garden. In fact, many lettuce varieties can be sown throughout the season for multiple harvests.

June Planning And Designing

As your gardens fill in and take their shape in June, this is a perfect month to walk around and assess your gardens. Are there spots where you could use more height, color, or fragrance? Did your daylilies multiply the past year and are they too large? Now is the time to take note of this to add more varieties to the garden and also identify which varieties need to be divided/replanted in the fall.

june planting: garden
Walk around and take note of your gardens in June. Where could you use more color? Which varieties should be divided and re-planted?

June Gardening Chores By Region

June is often the month when gardens start really filling in and becoming lush, offering up plentiful blooms and interest. Because of this, June is also an important month to be maintaining and working out in the garden. We’ll discuss chores specific to region, but there are several things everyone — no matter your location — should be doing in June.

  • Weed regularly. It’s best to spend a few minutes several times a week weeding than letting it build up and become overwhelming.
  • Work in the early morning or early evening. June can be quite hot in many parts of the country, so try to get out in the garden in the coolest parts of the morning or in the early evening.
  • Keep new plants watered regularly. Water the root systems in the early morning, avoiding foliage, to help prevent burning.
  • Apply mid-season fertilizer if needed.

June Gardening Chores: Northeast

In the Northeast, June is often the true awakening of the garden and many gardeners don’t get around to planting until the beginning of the month. Here are some garden chores for the Northeast in June:

  • Add tender annual wildflowers and bulbs to the garden once the danger of frost has passed.
  • Deadhead any spent spring-flowering bulbs like Daffodils and Tulips, leaving most of the foliage in tact until they die back.
  • Weed and add mulch to garden beds as needed.
  • Give your houseplants a much-needed dose of sunlight and bring them outdoors for the summer.
  • Make sure plants that need support or trellises — like Clematis and Peonies — have these in the beginning of the season.
  • Edge beds if necessary for a clean look.

June Gardening Chores: Southeast

June temperatures in the Southeast can be high, so there are several things to keep up with in the June garden:

  • Water, water, water (when possible)! Water the root systems in the early morning, avoiding foliage, to help prevent burning. If you have water restrictions in your area, choose one day per week to give everything a good soaking.
  • Fertilize any potted annuals or houseplants that are outside to help promote strong, healthy growth and blooms.
  • Raise the height of your lawn mower by one inch. Cutting your grass a little higher in June will help your lawn tolerate the heat and dry weather.
  • Deadhead long-lasting annuals like Marigolds, Geranium, and Zinnia to promote more blooms.
june planting: marigolds
Deadhead annuals like Marigolds as they finish blooming to promote long-lasting flowering.

June Gardening Chores: Midwest

The Midwest often has a cool spring, with June being the real start of the gardening season. Here is what to do in your garden in June:

  • Add tender annual wildflowers and bulbs to the garden once the danger of frost has passed.
  • Give your houseplants a much-needed dose of sunlight and bring them outdoors for the summer.
  • Prune spring-flowering trees and shrubs as they finish blooming.
  • Weed and add mulch to garden beds as needed.
  • Make sure plants that need support or trellises — like Clematis and Peonies — have these in the beginning of the season.
  • Deadhead any spent spring-flowering bulbs like Daffodils and Tulips, leaving most of the foliage in tact until they die back

June Gardening Chores: West

Depending on your area, the Western part of the country can be just warming up in June (Oregon) or have been warm for months (California). Here are some things you can do in the garden in June:

  • Prune spring-flowering trees and shrubs as they finish blooming.
  • Add organic mulch to your garden beds to help retain moisture.
  • Add tender annual wildflowers and bulbs to the garden once the danger of frost has passed.
  • Keep up with weeds by heading out into the garden at least once per week. This is important as weeds take away important nutrients from your plants.
  • Make sure to water potted plants and raised beds frequently; they tend to dry out quicker than in-ground gardens.
  • Give your houseplants a much-needed dose of sunlight and bring them outdoors for the summer.
june planting: sedum
Sedum is one of our favorite drought tolerant varieties. Bonus: pollinators love it!

The Summer Solstice In June

We enjoy the longest day of the year in June, which also means it is the strongest sun we'll have all summer long. This is a great time to think about ways you can help conserve water in your garden. Does your mulch need a refresher? If you're living in a drought-prone area, you may want to think about slowly overhauling your garden and adding in low-maintenance, drought-tolerant varieties that don't require a ton of supplemental water. Daylilies, Sedum, Lavender, and Coreopsis are some of our favorite perennials that are sun-loving, drought tolerant and low maintenance.

June is one of the busiest and most fun times in the garden. With just a little work and planting, you'll be able to enjoy a lush, flowering garden well through the fall months.

  1. Red Hot Poker Alcazar, Kniphofia with hummingbird

    'Alcazar' Red Hot Poker brings warm, fiery color to the garden with its vibrant flower spikes. Each flame-like bloom is formed with dangling red-orange buds that open from bottom to ...

    Learn More
    Red Hot Poker Alcazar Alcazar Torch Lily, Poker Plant Kniphofia Alcazar
    $16.98 Sale $13.99
    Per Bag of 3
    'Alcazar' Red Hot Poker brings warm, fiery color to the garden with its vibrant flower spikes. Each flame-like bloom is formed with dangling red-orange buds that open from bottom to top, revealing faded yellow interiors. A favorite of hummingbirds and butterflies, this unusual plant is easy to grow, perfect for beginner gardeners. Requires full sun. (Kniphofia)
    Learn More
  2. Pink Echinacea Magnus, Echinacea purpurea, Coneflower

    'Magnus' Coneflower has vibrant pink, ray-like flowers that surround deep-orange center cones, attracting plentiful pollinators to the garden throughout the summer. Leaving the spent...

    Learn More
    Magnus Echinacea Purple Coneflower Magnus Echinacea purpurea Magnus
    As low as $9.98 Sale $8.49
    Per Plant - 3" Pot
    'Magnus' Coneflower has vibrant pink, ray-like flowers that surround deep-orange center cones, attracting plentiful pollinators to the garden throughout the summer. Leaving the spent stems and flowerheads in place to overwinter will also attract birds. Coneflowers are notably tough native plants and 'Magnus' is no exception, withstanding drought, clay, humidity and harsh winter conditions without complaint. Easy to grow, this plant is a great choice for beginner and experienced gardeners alike. (Echinacea purpurea)
    Learn More
  3. Orange Butterfly Weed With Monarch Butterfly, Asclepias tuberosa

    Butterfly Weed is the iconic, bright orange beauty that's a staple in every butterfly garden. This showy native wildflower is easy to grow, cold hardy, and does well in poor, dry soi...

    Learn More
    Butterfly Weed Butterfly Weed Asclepias tuberosa
    As low as $14.98 Sale $11.24
    Per Plant - 3" Pot
    Butterfly Weed is the iconic, bright orange beauty that's a staple in every butterfly garden. This showy native wildflower is easy to grow, cold hardy, and does well in poor, dry soils. Long-lasting clusters of small, flat-topped flowers are crowned with a yellow, sun-kissed "corona" and bloom from June through August. Butterfly Weed is an important nectar source for Monarch butterflies and its leaves provide essential food for developing Monarch caterpillars - but expect to see a variety of pollinators making use of this plant. Please note the Bag of 3 are bareroots. (Asclepias tuberosa)
    Learn More
  4. Feather Reed Grass Karl Foerster, Calamagrostis acutiflora

    'Karl Foerster' Feather Reed Grass creates a dramatic garden accent, with tall, slender, vertical growth and feathery plumes of shifting bronze color that stay in place year-round. A...

    Learn More
    Karl Foerster Feather Reed Grass Karl Foerster Feather Reed Grass Calamagrostis x acutiflora Karl Foerster
    As low as $17.98 Sale $13.99
    Per Plant - 3.5" Pot
    'Karl Foerster' Feather Reed Grass creates a dramatic garden accent, with tall, slender, vertical growth and feathery plumes of shifting bronze color that stay in place year-round. An early bloomer, 'Karl Foerster' is a cool season grass that grows most rapidly in the spring season and produces notably early blooms. It is a clump-forming decorative grass, with an upward architectural growth habit, making it a dramatic specimen plant in garden or meadow. Torch-like plumes are widely used in dried flower arrangements. This sterile variety does not self-sow, is deer resistant, and notably cold hardy. (Calamagrostis acutiflora)
    Learn More
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